Saturday, August 19, 2017
Dakota Johnson and Giovanni Ribisi a New Scientology Couple?… Clearwater Residents Say...

Dakota Johnson and Giovanni Ribisi a New Scientology Couple?… Clearwater Residents Say ‘Fuck You’ to Miscavige!

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52326382 Celebrities Arrive for the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards held at the beach in Santa Monica, California on February 25, 2017. The awards are an annual tradition held every year the day before the Academy Awards. Celebrities Arrive for the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards held at the beach in Santa Monica, California on February 25, 2017. The awards are an annual tradition held every year the day before the Academy Awards.
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 French media were taking the piss out of Cruise and scientology over 11 years ago 

 BOLLOCKS! 

View post on imgur.com

Scientology Clearwater Hissy Fit

The Tampa NBC affiliate website covers the latest news in the Scientology v. Clearwater war of 2017.

Here is how the article begins:

CLEARWATER, Fla. (WFLA) — The Church of Scientology has declared an economic war on Clearwater Marine Aquarium and the stakes are high — $26 million in tourism tax funding that the church wants to block at Tuesday’s Pinellas County Commission meeting.

The church’s anger stems from a land purchase dispute involving a dirt parking lot next to Clearwater City Hall. The aquarium recently defied the church by selling that land to the City of Clearwater on April 20 for $4.25 million and rejecting Scientology’s $15 million offer.

City of Clearwater leaders want to develop the 1.4 acre parcel as part of its $50 million Imagine Clearwater plan to pump new life and commerce into the city’s downtown waterfront. The church wanted to buy the empty lot on the corner of Pierce St. and Osceola Ave. in order to build a pool and playground area for its Oak Cove religious retreat located next door. The church insists it is a critical element to its self-funded downtown development plan.

It did not take long for the smiling, glad-handing, magnanimous Miscavige to revert to form as the bully throwing a hissy fit because the minions did not kowtow and give in to his every wish.

When Miscavige goes all hissy, Muffins Yingling soon appears. Sure enough, she chimed in:

A scathing letter sent to the Pinellas Commission Monday by Scientology Attorney Monique Yingling accuses Clearwater Marine Aquarium of fiscal foolhardiness and gouging taxpayers. “Astoundingly, CMA rejected $15 million in private funding, and is now essentially asking to recoup that amount from taxpayer funds,” Yingling wrote.

The 7-page letter goes on to allege the aquarium is swimming in money due to the popularity of Winter the Dolphin and pays its CEO David Yates an exorbitant salary compared to other aquarium managers across the nation.

I wish they had attached the letter to their story. I bet it is a doozie.

It is certainly vicious sour grapes ranting of Miscavige, tidied up by Muffins into more presentable english.

Those first two things quoted are remarkable:

Scientology is really complaining about the use of TAXPAYER funds?  Recognizing irony is not the strong suit of scientology.

Everyone EXCEPT scientology remembers it is subsidized with taxpayer funds — WAY more than the $26 million they are now complaining about. They claim it is their RIGHT to not pay taxes and be subsidized. Whether you agree or disagree, the fact remains that all the NON-TAXABLE properties in Clearwater owned by scientology have their public services paid for by Clearwater’s taxpayers.

And a “bed tax” is a tax on TOURISTS coming to Clearwater and staying in hotels. Certainly scientology is NOT attracting tourists to Clearwater, in fact, many people choose to go elsewhere BECAUSE of the church.

And whether you agree or disagree with David Yates’ salary (seems high to me at $500Gs a year), there is one person who should NOT be throwing stones out of his opaque-windowed glasshouse: David Miscavige. The reason he even knows how much Mr. Yates earns is because the Aquarium, unlike scientology, is totally transparent with its finances. When scientology and Miscavige disclose his income (including the fair market value of the slave labor that serve him hand and foot, the church vehicles he is provided, the housing he is provided, the food, bespoke suits, handmade shoes and private just travel) then they might have grounds to complain. Then again, if that WAS public, they would not dare complain about a mere half a million bucks…

And it goes on to report that somehow scientology has managed to co-opt another USF professor to champion their cause.

Yingling cites USF Economics Professor Philip Porter:  “Because the study is biased and self-serving, its claims offer no good basis for decision-making and should be ignored.”  

It’s the old adage, if you have the money you can get an “expert” to offer an opinion to support you. Apparently this professor has stated that the Aquarium is grossly overstating their economic impact on the community. This is really rich.  I wrote about the earlier USF “Economic Impact Study” commissioned by scientology (Scientology Takes Clearwater for Suckers) because the ENTIRE study was based on “facts” provided by scientology.

Maybe if someone (other than scientology) paid Prof Porter he would savage the study done by his own university for scientology?

It is amazing to watch this unfold. Miscavige is being exposed to the world for what he really is. And finally, instead of just getting away with it because nobody dare incur his wrath, the mainstream media is shouting “the emperor has no clothes.”

http://www.mikerindersblog.org/scientology-clearwater-hissy-fit/

You Paid For It: Scientology trying to kill $26 million Clearwater aquarium funding after land sale dispute

CLEARWATER, Fla. (WFLA) — The Church of Scientology has declared an economic war on Clearwater Marine Aquarium and the stakes are high — $26 million in tourism tax funding that the church wants to block at Tuesday’s Pinellas County Commission meeting.

The church’s anger stems from a land purchase dispute involving a dirt parking lot next to Clearwater City Hall. The aquarium recently defied the church by selling that land to the City of Clearwater on April 20 for $4.25 million and rejecting Scientology’s $15 million offer.

City of Clearwater leaders want to develop the 1.4 acre parcel as part of its $50 million Imagine Clearwater plan to pump new life and commerce into the city’s downtown waterfront. The church wanted to buy the empty lot on the corner of Pierce St. and Osceola Ave. in order to build a pool and playground area for its Oak Cove religious retreat located next door. The church insists it is a critical element to its self-funded downtown development plan.

A scathing letter sent to the Pinellas Commission Monday by Scientology Attorney Monique Yingling accuses Clearwater Marine Aquarium of fiscal foolhardiness and gouging taxpayers. “Astoundingly, CMA rejected $15 million in private funding, and is now essentially asking to recoup that amount from taxpayer funds,” Yingling wrote.

RELATED: Clearwater votes to buy lot coveted by Church of Scientology

The 7-page letter goes on to allege the aquarium is swimming in money due to the popularity of Winter the Dolphin and pays its CEO David Yates an exorbitant salary compared to other aquarium managers across the nation.

Yingling’s letter also includes a report by USF Economics Professor Philip Porter that concludes the aquarium’s claims of economic impact, which form the basis of its $26 million tourist tax funding request, are grossly exaggerated and based on a study that includes a “massive and false claim.”

“Because the study is biased and self-serving, its claims offer no good basis for decision-making and should be ignored,” Porter writes in an executive summary of his report..

At Tuesday afternoon’s Pinellas County Commission meeting, commissioners will vote on a recommendation by Commission Chair Janet Long to fund the Clearwater Marine Aquarium $26 million over a 3-year period with proceeds from the county’s bed tax. Long’s memo calling for funding is based on a recommendation from the Pinellas County Tourist Development Council.

RELATED: Clearwater City officials meet with Scientology leader to discuss downtown revitalization

According to TDC records, the bed tax funding will be used for the Clearwater aquarium’s planned expansion estimated to cost $53 million. The TDC study claims the Clearwater aquarium has a total annual economic impact of $674.7 million, a figure that the Church of Scientology and its experts vigorously dispute.

The fireworks at the commission meeting will begin sometime after 2 p.m. on Tuesday. We will be there preparing a You Paid For It report for our 6 p.m. newscast on News Channel 8.

You Paid For It: Scientology loses effort to kill $26 million Clearwater Marine Aquarium funding

Bellend twitter power!!!

Isn’t It Relevant That the Star of The Handmaid’s Tale Belongs to a Secretive, Allegedly Oppressive Religion? 

Screenshot via Hulu/The Handmaid’s Tale

The Handmaid’s Tale is one of the finest dystopian novels ever written, and it is, inescapably and fundamentally, about women’s oppression under an ultra-conservative regime. The much-anticipated Hulu series based on the book doesn’t shy away from the original subject matter; it couldn’t, really, and remain the Handmaid’s Tale. Which is why it’s so curious that in a recent panel discussion, the cast of the show studiously refused to admit that it’s a feminist story. It brings to mind the way Handmaid’s star Elisabeth Moss has, for years, cheerily dodged questions about her lifelong membership in Scientology and the alleged abuses within the church.

The screeners of the show I’ve seen are excellent: gritty and tense, every shot as spring-loaded with meaning and menace as the novel. The drab, washed-out color scheme and touches of modernity in the world of Gilead lend it an air of cinéma vérité that’s as creepy as it is effective, a feeling that it takes place in a moment just around a lurking corner from our own. It feels, as many people have said, horribly relevant and unpleasantly timely.

Except if you’re a member of the show’s cast, who, for the most part, have remained anxiously laser-focused on how “universal” the show’s themes are. MTV’s Rachel Handler wrote a long and excellent piece about Handmaid’s Tale premiering at Tribeca Film Festival earlier this month. During a post-screening discussion, she wrote, the cast “deflected notions of social resonance,” choosing to steer their answers away from politics or feminism or current events and back on just about anything else about the series: the skill of the screenwriting, or the “resilience” of Offred, the main character played by Moss.

Madeline Brewer, who plays the Handmaid Janine, even reassured the audience that the show isn’t “any sort of feminist propaganda. I think it’s a story about women and about humans.” She added, “You see [in the pilot], the three people [publicly] hanged on the wall were all men. This story affects all people.”

To insist that the goddamn Handmaid’s Tale has no special relevance for women is, of course, intentionally obtuse in a way that suggests that the people shaping the show’s marketing campaign are worried. It seems like someone, somewhere, is concerned about the ratings implications of being accused of Committing Feminism, alienating the precious 18-34 male demographic and dooming the show to be shown only in a backroom at that feminist bookstore from Portlandia on a dreary loop forever. Showrunner Bruce Miller told the New York Times, “I don’t feel like it’s a male or female story; it’s a survival story.”

Disappointingly, even Margaret Atwood herself gave the NYT a terrible answer that fundamentally misunderstands the meaning of the term “feminism,” seeming to mistake it for a political philosophy where women can do no wrong:

Ms. Atwood, on the phone from her Toronto home, interrogated the phrase. “When you say ‘feminist’ do you mean: Should women have the same rights as other human beings? Then, yes. But what else do we mean by that term? Do we mean women are angelically more perfect than men? Well, no. Women are human beings. That can be a plus or a minus.”

A recent New Yorker profile outlines Atwood’s sometimes prickly relationship to the concept of feminism, which she associated, in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, with being policed on what to wear or how to present herself:

In the sometimes divisive years of second-wave feminism, Atwood reserved the right to remain nonaligned. “I didn’t want to become a megaphone for any one particular set of beliefs,” she said. “Having gone through that initial phase of feminism when you weren’t supposed to wear frocks and lipstick—I never had any use for that. You should be able to wear them without people saying you are a traitor to your sex.

As The New Yorker saw it, it’s not that Atwood resists being called a feminist, so much as she wants to be clear about what that means:

Given that her works are a mainstay of women’s-studies curricula, and that she is clearly committed to women’s rights, Atwood’s resistance to a straightforward association with feminism can come as a surprise. But this wariness reflects her bent toward precision, and a scientific sensibility that was ingrained from childhood: Atwood wants the terms defined before she will state her position. Her feminism assumes women’s rights to be human rights, and is born of having been raised with a presumption of absolute equality between the sexes.

Moss took the same tack at the Tribeca discussion—women’s rights are human rights, and Handmaid’s Tale isn’t a feminist story, but one with broad human implications. But she pushed the concept much further, as Handler wrote, into a totally apolitical realm:

“For me, [The Handmaid’s Tale is] not a feminist story. It’s a human story, because women’s rights are human rights. So, for me, I never intended to play Peggy as a feminist. I never intended to play Offred as a feminist. They’re women, and they’re humans. Offred’s a wife, a mother, a best friend. She has a job. And she is a person who’s not supposed to be a hero, and she falls into it. And she kind of does what she has to do to survive, to find her daughter. It’s about love, honestly, so much of this story. So for me, you know, I never approach anything with any sort of political agenda. I approach it from a very human place, I hope.” (It’s a point she emphasized again in an interview with Teen Vogue: “It’s very important people understand this is about human rights, not just women’s.”)

This is a baffling, almost brain-melting answer that gets worse the longer you look at it: playing Offred as a feminist is opposed to playing her as “a wife, a mother, a best friend”? Embracing the story’s “political agenda” means ignoring the elements of it that are about love, survival, and memory? Why couldn’t those things co-exist? (One of the parts of the book that has stayed with me since first reading it as a young teenager is a banal dream Offred has: she’s wearing earrings, and one of them has broken. “Nothing beyond that,” she thinks. “Just the brain going through its back files.” It’s a razor-sharp moment, a reminder of how stubbornly Offred’s old life clings to her, the needles of longing that hit her in the softest, most unexpected places.)

But this is, frankly, not a surprising show of cognitive dissonance from Moss, who seems like a nice, smart, hardworking person, and who’s stubbornly refused to talk about Scientology, a deeply problematic religion in which she was raised and reportedly remains a member of to this day. As reporter Tony Ortega points out, Moss completed a course called Expanded Grade III in 1999 that would put her, even then, fairly far along the “bridge” of time and money spent in Scientology.

Moss has defended her refusal to talk about Scientology as a matter of privacy, as she put it in a Guardian interview last year:

“It is weird for me to be put in the position where I am like, ‘No, I can’t. I don’t really want to talk about this.’ You feel kind of like, I am a nice person who likes to talk about stuff. I also get the curiosity. I get the fascination. I become fascinated with things that are none of my business as well. I am just fascinated when someone breaks up with somebody. I want to know all about it. I am very interested in what people are wearing, and all of that kind of thing, but you have a right to your privacy.”

She did the same thing back in 2014, talking to Willa Paskin at Vulture, again mysteriously implying that people who judge Scientology harshly just don’t know what they’re talking about:

We are almost at the ocean when I bring up Scientology, the church Moss was raised in. Her affiliation with the church remains the strange, odd fact of her biography, the thing that does not belong in her regular-chick story. “I’m not going to talk about it anymore,” she says firmly. “I said what it meant to me, and anyone can go and look at that if they want to know what I feel. But now it’s private, off limits.”

She has previously spoken about how the church is personally helpful to her, not anti-gay, and “grossly misunderstood by the media.” But Moss does not talk about Scientology even with friends and seems very comfortable with how uncomfortable it makes other people. “I would feel the same way, honestly,” she says. “I think if there was something that I didn’t know and didn’t understand, I would probably feel as opinionated. You know how you’re opinionated about when someone breaks up? Celebrities break up and you just feel like you know what happened?”

That would all be fine, sort of, if the book and documentary Going Clear, a recent A&E series by ex-Scientologist actress Leah Remini, and a growing chorus of personal stories by people who have left the church didn’t contain such disturbing allegations. Ex-members have described patterns of coercion, control, and even physical abuse by church leader David Miscavige (all things that Scientology representatives have denied). Miscavige’s wife Shelly hasn’t been seen publicly in years. Disobedient members of the Sea Org are reportedly disciplined at a horrific prison camp known as The Hole, which the Tampa Bay Times described in a 2013 story asa place of “confinement and humiliation.” (Scientology, again, has said that reports of conditions at The Hole are exaggerations and mischaracterizations delivered by embittered ex-members.)

There’s also the rather confused matter of how Scientology views women: L. Ron Hubbard wrote in the ‘50s in his Scientology: A New Slant on Life that a woman’s place was in the home and nowhere else: “A society in which women are taught anything but the management of a family, the care of men, and the creation of the future generation is a society which is on its way out.” More recently, those passages were removed from updated versions of the book. (Update: Ortega pointed out that the passages remain in new versions of 1951’s Science of Survival.)

But women who have left Scientology detail a series of abuses against women: a Tampa Bay Times story in 2010 detailed an alleged pattern of forced abortions for women in the Sea Org; a lawsuit against the church by one woman who says she was forced to have an abortion has been mired in complicated court proceedings since 2009. More recently, the public learned that celebrity Scientologist Danny Masterson is being investigated for sexual assault; all three women making the accusations allege that they were pressured by Scientology not to publicize what they say happened to them. (Masterson has denied the sexual assault allegations and a representative for him called them a scheme to boost ratings for Remini’s show.)

It’s fine that Elisabeth Moss doesn’t want to discuss her religion, or the many alleged abuses within it. (It’s possible that she’s never seen a single unpleasant thing in the church, given that celebrities reportedly receive kid-glove handling.) But it combines in an unpleasant way with her refusal, and that of the rest of the Handmaid’s cast, to have even the most basic conversation about politics or feminism in the context of the show. From here, it starts to look less like making the show “universal” and more like an anxious, fearful whitewashing.

To promote the show, Hulu recently sent a handful of women reporters, including me, a signed copy of the novel and an enormous sweatshirt, red with a white hood. It reads “Nolite te bastardes carborundorum” in black all-caps, the nonsense-Latin phrase of inspiration and defiance that Offred finds scratched in the closet of her room-cum-jail cell. The package also contained an invitation, written by Moss, to join a Facebook group called #Maidez, which vaguely promises to discuss the “injustices” of the day.

In the letter, Moss refers to the rights of “women, LGBTQ people and those of diverse faiths” being eradicated “by a newly formed theocratic dictatorship,” which is an accurate and—for her, unusually pointed—description of the show. It is, she adds, a “story as relevant now as the day it was first written.” Then Moss invites all of us to talk solutions, in language as carefully stripped of political meaning as anything else she’s ever said: “Our goal is to facilitate positive discussion among solution-oriented people who believe in the power of sharing ideas and personal connections.”

I don’t know what that means, but I hope it works. I also don’t know why anyone who loves this book would want to dress like a Handmaid. And I fundamentally don’t understand the impulse to shove the meaning of the novel as far away from oneself as possible.

In short, I guess, I don’t understand who the Handmaid’s Tale cast is afraid of, who they think they’re answering to, or where they think disavowing feminism will get them. We all inhabit this new reality together, whether we like it or not, and pretending like this is just any show or any time in history won’t save any of us.

http://themuse.jezebel.com/isnt-it-relevant-that-the-star-of-the-handmaids-tale-be-1794667562 

latest Popbitch

“My hair loss comes from three
things: alopecia, genetics and
head spinning” – George Sampson
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Email stories [email protected]
* Lil’ Lembit: Baby Opik on the way!
* Kelvin MacKenzie: Still a prick!
* Charts: Ed vs Bandit for No. 1
————————————

Orlanded gentry <<

Snatch me if you can

Did you hear Orlando Bloom on
Radio 1 yesterday, describing
himself as “just a pikey from
Kent”? It caused a bit of head
scratching in Canterbury, as
people from the area seem to
remember him as having lived
in Virgilia House on the edge
of the leafy campus of the
University of Kent – where
Tory garden parties were held
in his mum’s vast back garden.

He must’ve been selling a hell
of a lot of pegs and heather to
his classmates at St Edmund’s
Public School to afford the
upkeep on such swish digs.

————————————
Ajax’s football stadium, the
Amsterdam Arena, is going to
be renamed after Johan Cruyff.
————————————

Bird feed <<

Jane and Michael Bankrupt

The producers of the upcoming
sequel to Mary Poppins thought
it might be a fun idea to ask
Julie Andrews to appear at the
end of the movie in a cameo as
a balloon seller.

Julie was initially interested
but wanted to know how much she
would be paid. Fee discussions
rose and rose until producers
finally suggested a whopping
$8 million. Not good enough,
Ms Andrews said. It had to be
$10 million or she wouldn’t
do it.

So they asked Angela Lansbury
instead, who was very happy to
accept the role. For $200,000.

————————————
Harry Styles bought James Corden
a “No Trump Anytime” road sign
for his birthday last August.
————————————

>> Big Questions <<
What people are asking?

Idris Elba has starred in huge-
rated shows for HBO and the BBC,
award-winning indie films for
Netflix and huge blockbusters
for major Hollywood studios. He
is an unfailingly bankable star.
So how on earth did Sky manage
to fuck up the handling of his
new show so badly that it only
drew 23,000 viewers for its
second episode – figures that
make The Young Pope look like
the moon landing?

————————————
The Popbitch postbag this week has
mainly centred on the correct term
for Mel B’s “thing”. The one that
sounded nicest? “Profiteroling”.
————————————

Hardcore spawn <<

Waiting on little Lembit

Our congratulations to Lembit
Opik, who has just officially
confirmed that he is due to
become a father.

When we first saw his girlfriend
announce the pregnancy on Twitter
we were a little surprised that
a wild animal like Lem would put
his flirtatious ways behind him,
settle down and start a family.

Not half as surprised as Lem
himself though. His baby mama
recalls the moment she told
him the joyous news:

“When I told Lembit, I think
he was shocked as his first
reaction was, ‘Oh no’.”

***********************************
FREE TICKETS – Election Special
If you’d like to hear more about
this election than just the words
“strong and stable” over and over
again we have a limited number of
free tickets to a discussion on
Brexit and the General Election:
http://bit.ly/2plnGkL
Tues 2nd May, 6:45–8pm, London W11
Email for tix: [email protected]
***********************************

Kelvin’s comrades <<

With friends like these…

They say you can judge a man
by the company he keeps. So
who has been rallying around
the obstinate arsehole Kelvin
MacKenzie in his hour of need?

Erm.

Kelv says “a number” of MPs got
in touch to tell him that his
contentious comments about Ross
Barkley were absolutely fine.
While that isn’t a lie as such,
the “number” that Kelv alludes
to in his Spectator column this
week appears to be “one”. And
not one of the good ones either.

The MP who came rushing to
Kelv’s side? Andrew Mitchell.
A man you may remember who
positively drowned himself in
glory during the shitstorm of
his own creation: Plebgate.

————————————
How Mail Online covered the death
of Erin Moran from Happy Days.
Monday: “Died from heroin overdose”
Tuesday: “Died from stage 4 cancer”
————————————

Horsing around <<

Ring-a-ring-a-noses

Last week we reported that
renowned cocaine fancier
Frankie Dettori was looking
to ride the rather aptly-named
Escobar for the 2000 Guineas.

We found out this week how
the horse got its name.

Escobar has a ring of white
hair around one nostril.

————————————
There’s a new Colombian-themed bar
in Reykjavik called Pablo Discobar.
————————————

Broken record <<

Unheard hits of Bananarama

Bananarama dropped a pretty big
bomb in the Guardian this week.
According to Keren Woodward, the
song Robert De Niro’s Waiting is
about date rape. (“You’ll listen
to it with new ears now,” says
Keren.)

We had no idea that Bananarama
tackled such weighty subjects
in their songs. Especially as
Malcolm McLaren always used to
claim that he wrote a song for
them called Don’t Touch Me Down
There, Daddy – and that they
refused to sing it.

And it’s not as if they’d turn
a song down on the grounds of
quality. Look what they did to
Careless Whisper.

Listen:
https://youtu.be/ta4GB4VsWr8

————————————
Siobhan Fahey of Bananarama was the
London Records press officer behind
1977’s Father Abraham & The Smurfs.
————————————

No income tax, no VAT <<

We spent it all on Lanzini

Newcastle and West Ham fans
weren’t that surprised yesterday
to see the club owners they
despise caught up in a spate
of mismanagement and tax
dodging headlines.

It’s not even the first time
this has happened to West Ham
supremo Karren Brady. She was
arrested back in 2009 while at
Birmingham City, in a City of
London investigation into
possible tax offences and agent
payments (the charges were
dropped later in the year).

These investigations have been
aided by the info provided by
Football Leaks’ hacking – but
this public service journalism
hasn’t gone down too well
everywhere. The investigation
into Cristiano Ronaldo’s image
rights by El Mundo has landed
their editors in some pretty
hot water. Yesterday, a Spanish
judge threatened them with jail
for breaching Ronaldo’s privacy.

Privacy to hide an alleged
€150m of payments offshore
in a tax haven, they claim.

————————————
Peter Thiel’s spooky CIA-enabling
tech company Palantir has reached a
settlement with the US Department of
Labor over a lawsuit alleging racial
discrimination against Asians.
————————————

Hot shot <<

The Vince of black America

The relationship between African
American communities and the US
police force seems like a ripe
subject for a documentary movie.
It’s a sensitive topic though,
so you’d need to make absolutely
certain that the project was put
in the right hands.

The hands of the famous, white,
gun-owning Hollywood Republican
Vince Vaughn? Sure! Why not?

Vince Vaughn is making this
documentary for AT&T’s Audience
Network, whose boss Chris Long
said they were “interested in
something that’s happening in
the media, but that part of
the story’s not being told”.

And how has Vince been warming
up to tell this vital story? By
filming a police crime thriller
with… Mel Gibson! One called
‘Dragged Across Concrete’.

————————————
Pharrell and Robin Thicke’s Blurred
Lines plagiarism appeal says that
musicians can’t copyright a groove.
————————————

Falling Apple <<

Down with downloads

How soon until we bid farewell
to iTunes? There’s word doing
the rounds in tech circles that
Apple is looking to shake the
iconic brand loose as they try
to coax people into signing up
to their persistently stagnant
Apple Music brand instead.

This week they started the
rebrand of podcasts, with all
new podcast material dropping
the word “iTunes” in favour
of “Apple Podcasts”.

Some think they’re so hellbent
on pushing people on to their
subscription-based service
that the whole iTunes store
might be on the chopping block.
If so, be ready to say goodbye
to downloaded music.

***********************************
Would you like to ask a question
to our UK Eurovision entry Lucie
Jones? Send by 10am Friday morning
[email protected]
***********************************

>> Hmmms <<
Comics, cartoons, cubs

Kermit x R Kelly:
http://bit.ly/2pCGLSf

RIP Beano comic god,
Leo Baxendale:
http://downthetubes.net/?p=37617

Local news of the week,
South Africa edition:
http://bit.ly/2plwCqg

The Revolution talk Prince:
http://bit.ly/2p7hLkK

World leaders as hipsters:
http://bit.ly/2qib6C9

Chicago Cubs’ Addison Russell
has a nerdy hobby:
http://es.pn/2ozNf4l

The excellent Bananarama
interview in the Guardian:
http://bit.ly/2qiDjZw

************************************
Thanks to: gentlemanthug, JE, G,
VJ SG, RB, JM, FF, stan2a10shun,
uncle_whuppity, HM, DL, CW
************************************

Old Jokes Home:
A photon checks into a hotel
and is asked “Do you have any
luggage?”.

The photon replies, “No,
I’m travelling light.”

Still Bored?
Episode 8 of sci-fi podcast To The
Manor Borne By Robots. “Marketing
4 Marketers” – marketing, branding,
crowdfunding and sex with demons:
http://bit.ly/1M33ryN

  • Intergalactic Walrus

    I can’t understand the attraction to Giovanni Ribisi. That dude gives me the icks! Did Dakota first go to rehab in her teens or was that just a rumor back in the day? She reminds me of Bijou Phillips but with a slightly better family & career (at least for the moment). The clams seem to target celebs who have celebrity families don’t they?

    She’d be better of hanging around Tippi’s Shambala Preserve. She’ll find a better class of animal there than at the Celebrity Centre. If she’s hooking up with Ribisi or any other clam, let’s hope she’s on the pill.

    • she was never the brightest spark [if you follow the gossip sites which I do] and is a heavy smoker…. which, come to think of it, are perfect attributes for a clam